TESTEVERYTHING

Thursday, 1 December 2016

Useful Tips in Mobile Automation






  •  How to use ADB (Android Debug Bridge) over wifi | ...
  •  How to know app package and activities information...
  • Webdriver compare data/css between two pages
  • How to Re-Sign an ios App from an External Develop...
  • To know all devices connected to machines / simula...
  • Automation Testing of Android app on device using ...
  • Calabash ios installation steps
  • Calabash-ios commands
  • INSTALL IDEVICEINSTALLER ON MAC MACHINE
  • MOBILE WEB/APPLICATION AUTOMATION INSTALLATION GUI...
  • Easiest Way to Get the Crash Logs in ios 
  • Blocking Internet for Specific Apps
  • Business Models: How Does Mobile App Makes Money? 
  • Projecting Android Screen on to Your PC
  • Bandwidth Throttling Using Fiddler 
  • ADB commands with examples
  • Android Screencast: Android screen to Windows PC
  • Limiting Internet Speed On Your Mobile Device (Ban... 
  •  Wireless ADB
  •  Recording Android Device Screen using ADB
  •  Securing Your Smartphones
  •  Mobile Application Testing –Think Before You Test
  • Android on Windows
  • Wednesday, 16 November 2016

    Actual differences between Explicit and Implicit Waits

    Hi All,

    As i have already mentioned the differences Explicit and Implicit Waits in my earlier post but now we will see the actual results. there will be two conditions we can think of it what will happen if implicit wait is greater than explicit wait OR  implicit wait is lower than explicit wait

    lets see what will happen


    Condition 1: implicit wait is greater than explicit wait

               implicitlyWait = 10 seconds
                explicitWait = 2 seconds
                ///////////////////////////////////////
                public static void main(String[]args) {
                FirefoxDriver driver = new FirefoxDriver();
                driver.manage().window().maximize();
                driver.manage().timeouts().implicitlyWait(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
                driver.get("https://www.google.com");
                try {
                            Date date = new Date();
                            System.out.println(" before " + new Timestamp(date.getTime()));
                            WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, 2);
                            wait.until(ExpectedConditions.presenceOfElementLocated(By.xpath("//div[contains(text(),'NOT FOUND ELEMENT')]")));
                } catch (Exception e) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            Date date = new Date();
                            System.out.println(" after " + new Timestamp(date.getTime()));
                            e.printStackTrace();
                }


    /////////////////////////////////

    let see the output in console:   taking 10 seconds

    before 2016-11-16 16:24:33.128
    after 2016-11-16 16:24:43.321

    Condition 2: implicit wait is lower than explicit wait
               implicitlyWait = 2 seconds
                explicitWait = 10 seconds
                ///////////////////////////////////////
                public static void main(String[]args) {
                FirefoxDriver driver = new FirefoxDriver();
                driver.manage().window().maximize();
                driver.manage().timeouts().implicitlyWait(2, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
                driver.get("https://www.google.com");
                try {
                            Date date = new Date();
                            System.out.println(" before " + new Timestamp(date.getTime()));
                            WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, 10);
                            wait.until(ExpectedConditions.presenceOfElementLocated(By.xpath("//div[contains(text(),'NOT FOUND ELEMENT')]")));
                } catch (Exception e) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            Date date = new Date();
                            System.out.println(" after " + new Timestamp(date.getTime()));
                            e.printStackTrace();
                }


    /////////////////////////////////

    let see the output in console:   taking 10 seconds

    before 2016-11-16 16:26:53.355
     after 2016-11-16 16:27:03.53

    Monday, 14 November 2016

    WebDriver | Automation | launch/Execute on different version of Firefox

    Run tests on specific Firefox version | Selenium


    Firefox binary

    Imagine a situation where you have to test your web application against two different versions of the Firefox browser. By default, when you instantiate FirefoxDriver, the Firefox version that is available on the PATH variable is launched. But if you want to launch a different version of Firefox, we need to use Firefox Binary. For this first steps you have to install all the versions of Firefox which you want to test on your system.

    Make sure the installed Firefox versions on different path locations using Custom installation

    Installing multiple versions of Firefox


    Suppose you have already installed the Firefox(version 22) means default Firefox is already installed. this can be found on your program file location like this..

    "C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox"

    Now we have to install another Firefox version (lets take Firefox version 23).

    1. Download this version from Mozilla site and start installing it.

    2. When you reach the following screen in your installation, select Custom.




    3. Enter the path as "C:\Mozilla Firefox\" in the path field as shown as follows, and proceed with the installation:



    4. Now try to launch Firefox from your code; it will launch Firefox 22 version (default Firefox browser) as it is available in the PATH variable.

    5. So, in order to use Firefox 23.0, try to use Firefox Binary. The following is the code example for it:

    Here we have to define the path of my another installed Firefox version


    import java.io.File;
    import org.openqa.selenium.firefox.FirefoxBinary;
    import org.openqa.selenium.firefox.FirefoxDriver;
    import org.openqa.selenium.firefox.FirefoxProfile;

    private WebDriver driver;

    FirefoxBinary binary = new FirefoxBinary(new File("C:\\Mozilla Firefox\\firefox.exe"));

    FirefoxProfile profile = new FirefoxProfile();   

    driver = new FirefoxDriver(binary, profile);

    driver.get("http://www.google.com");








    Sunday, 13 November 2016

    WebDriver Event Listeners


    WebDriver Event Listeners

    Selenium WebDriver provides a very good framework for tracking the various events that happen while you're executing your test scripts using WebDriver. Many navigation events that get fi red before and after an event occurs (such as before and after navigating to a URL, before and after browser back-navigation, and so on) can be tracked and captured


    How it works?
    The Listeners use to listen for the events in the registered webdriver.  It can be any type of event or action. Say, page navigation, element click, changing values in a text field (analogy to javascript onXYZ () series methods) and even exceptions.
    To enable this feature,
    1. Create our own user defined Event listener class
    2. Create an EventFiringWebDriverobject by means of webdriver instance,
    3. And register the Listener to the EventFiringWebDriver instance.
    How to create your own event listener classes:
    You can create a  event listener class in two ways, those are
    • By implementing WebDriverEventListener interface
    • By extending AbstractWebDriverEventListener class


    The following fl ow diagram explains what has to be done to capture all of the events
    raised by EventFiringWebDriver during the execution of test cases:



    like
    // Creating webdriver  instance
    WebDriver driver = new FirefoxDriver();
    // Creating  EventFiringWebDriver instance
    EventFiringWebDriver eventFiringWD= new EventFiringWebDriver(driver);
    // Creating instance of eventListener, that we just defined
    EventListenerCreated EventListenerobj =new EventListenerCreated ();
    // Register the Listener with the event firing driver
    eventFiringWD.register(EventListenerobj );
    eventFiringWD.get("https://www.google.co.in/");
    eventFiringWD.findElement(By.className("nosuchclassName"));


    Step 1- Create a new Class that will implement WebDriverEventListener methods

    package testcases;

    import org.openqa.selenium.By;
    import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;
    import org.openqa.selenium.WebElement;
    import org.openqa.selenium.support.events.WebDriverEventListener;

    public class ActivityCapture implements WebDriverEventListener {
    @Override
    public void afterChangeValueOf(WebElement arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    }
    @Override
    public void afterClickOn(WebElement arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    System.out.println("After click "+arg0.toString());
    }

    @Override
    public void afterFindBy(By arg0, WebElement arg1, WebDriver arg2) {
    System.out.println("After FindBy "+arg0.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void afterNavigateBack(WebDriver arg0) {
    System.out.println("After navigating back "+arg0.toString());
    }

    @Override
    public void afterNavigateForward(WebDriver arg0) {
    System.out.println("After navigating forword "+arg0.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void afterNavigateTo(String arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    System.out.println("After navigating "+arg0.toString());
    System.out.println("After navigating "+arg1.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void afterScript(String arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    }
    @Override
    public void beforeChangeValueOf(WebElement arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    }
    @Override
    public void beforeClickOn(WebElement arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    System.out.println("before click "+arg0.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void beforeFindBy(By arg0, WebElement arg1, WebDriver arg2) {
    System.out.println("before FindBY "+arg0.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void beforeNavigateBack(WebDriver arg0) {
    System.out.println("Before navigating back "+arg0.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void beforeNavigateForward(WebDriver arg0) {
    System.out.println("Before navigating Forword "+arg0.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void beforeNavigateTo(String arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    System.out.println("Before navigating "+arg0.toString());
    System.out.println("Before navigating "+arg1.toString());
    }
    @Override
    public void beforeScript(String arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    }
    @Override
    public void onException(Throwable arg0, WebDriver arg1) {
    System.out.println("Testcase done"+arg0.toString());
    System.out.println("Testcase done"+arg1.toString());
    }
    }
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    package testcases;

    import testcases.ActivityCapture;

    import org.openqa.selenium.By;
    import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;
    import org.openqa.selenium.firefox.FirefoxDriver;
    import org.openqa.selenium.support.events.EventFiringWebDriver;

    public class ListnerDemo {

    public static void main(String []args){

    System.out.println("Started");

    WebDriver driver=new FirefoxDriver();

    EventFiringWebDriver event1=new EventFiringWebDriver(driver);

    ActivityCapture handle=new ActivityCapture();

    event1.register(handle);

    event1.navigate().to("http://www.facebook.com");

    event1.findElement(By.id("email")).sendKeys("asdsadsa");

    event1.findElement(By.id("loginbutton")).click();

    event1.quit();

    System.out.println("End");
    }

    }




    Thursday, 10 November 2016

    Webdriver/Selenium Difference between methods .isDisplayed() and .isEnabled()?

    Hi All,
    I have seen so many posts where people asked the differences between .isDisplayed() and .isEnabled() in Selenium/Webdriver automation and found mostly people are still confused.
    The methods .isDisplayed() and .isEnabled() have nothing in common.
     Here I am trying to explain the read differences between .isDisplayed() and .isEnabled(). As name itself clearly says .isDisplayed() means is my object are visible or not on my webpage means Am I able to see my element through my eyes.


    Method .isDisplayed() :


    An element is considered displayed when it is perceptually visible to the human eye.
    The element displayed algorithm is a boolean state where true signifies that the element is displayed and false signifies that the element is not displayed.

    To compute the state on element:
    • ·         If the attribute hidden is set, return false.
    • ·         If the computed value of the display style property is "none", return false.

    Like
    <input type="hidden" name="abc" value="10" id="hiddenFiled1" />

    Observe the output, since element with id hiddenField1 is hidden from web page, so isDisplayed method return false, whereas isEnabled() method return true.



    OR

    Refer below link


    Try to run with display: block;  and display: none;




    Method .isEnabled() :


    An element is considered enabled if it's not a form control (button, input, textarea, select or option) or when the user interactions and focus are not blocked with the disabled attribute/property.
    Is Element Enabled determines if the referenced element is enabled or not. This operation only makes sense on form controls.

    Like
    Last name: <input type="text" name="lname" disabled><br>













    Last name: <input type="text" name="lname" enabled><br>


     
    Refer below link


    Last name: <input type="text" name="lname" disabled><br>



    Which one is right ?

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